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Pope approves early ordination for seminarian sick with Leukemia

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Pope at Audience: Church is the house and school of prayer

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Young woman dies after getting legal abortion in Argentina

Young girl. / Pixabay

ACI Prensa Staff, Apr 13, 2021 / 19:00 pm (CNA).

A young woman in Argentina died April 11 following a legal chemical abortion, the first such recorded death after the passage of a law legalizing abortion in December last year.

María del Valle González López was a 23-year-old student in the town of La Paz in Mendoza Province, Argentina. According to the Argentine newspaper Clarín, the young woman went on April 7, to the Arturo Illia hospital in La Paz for an abortion.

“There she was prescribed a medication - presumably misoprostol - and on Friday she began to feel ill. She was referred to the main healthcare facility in the eastern area of Mendoza, Perrupato Hospital, where they diagnosed a general infection that may have caused her death,”  Clarín reported.

The investigation into the death of María del Valle was started by the Santa Rosa Prosecutor's Office, but due to its complexity it will be sent to the San Martín Prosecutor's Office next week, Clarín said.

The results of the autopsy should be known soon, although it is not clear exactly when they will be released.

Misoprostol is a drug used to induce abortion in early pregnancy or to expedite a miscarriage. Potential side effects of the medication include bleeding and deadly hypovolemic shock.

Generally, a woman who takes misoprostol then has a D&C (dilation and curettage) to remove any of the baby’s remains from the uterus.

If the D&C is done using equipment that is not properly sterilized or is contaminated, it can cause an infection that could lead to septicemia or a generalized infection, which can lead to death.

Dr. Luis Durand, an Argentine surgeon, told ACI Prensa, CNA’s Spanish language news partner, that abortion “is not a medical act, regardless of whether it’s legal or not.”

He noted that “until a few months ago, [abortion] was a criminal act in Argentine law.”

“A medical act must always seek to improve the situation of whoever undergoes the intervention, although circumstantially it may fail and be unsuccessful, but 'interrupting the life' of any human being in an intentional or premeditated way can never be considered a medical act,” Durand said.

“The baby always dies a violent death. Either substances are injected into the uterus that burn the baby, or it is removed by dismemberment, or it is torn off by extreme uterine contractions and dies from asphyxiation,” he added.

The deceased young woman was studying Social Work at the National University of Cuyo. As soon as her death became known, various activists and pro-life groups in Argentina flooded social media with the hashtags #MurióPorAbortoLegal (she died from legal abortion) and #AbortoLegalMataIgual (legal abortion kills the same way as illegal).

Pro-life leader Guadalupe Batallán tweeted Monday that “María del Valle was 23 years old and had her whole life in front of her. She was a student and had become president of Radical Youth in Mendoza. She had a legal abortion on Wednesday and by the weekend she was already dead. I’m telling you because the feminists remain silent. #MurioPorAbortoLegal.”

“If María had died from a clandestine (illegal at the time) abortion, feminists would be tearing the whole city apart, but since María died from a legal abortion and that doesn’t suit (their cause), it’s scrubbed,” wrote Belén Lombardi, a young mother and pro-life activist.

Pro-life leaders: Allowing mail-order abortion pill will pose 'grave danger' for women

Ivanko80/Shutterstock

Washington D.C., Apr 13, 2021 / 18:00 pm (CNA).

Pro-life groups criticized the Biden administration for allowing the distribution of the abortion pill through the mail during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

“With this action, the Biden administration has made it clear that it will prioritize abortion over women's safety,” said March for Life President Jeanne Mancini. “Allowing unsupervised chemical abortions via telemedicine, without requiring timely access to medical care, will put women in grave danger.”

In a Monday letter from the commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the FDA announced it would “exercise enforcement discretion” on its regulations of the abortion pill. Acting FDA commissioner Janet Woodcock said she would allow for the abortion pill regimen to be prescribed remotely and sent to women through the mail or through a mail-order pharmacy.

“Further, to the extent all of the other requirements of the Mifepristone REMS Program are met, CDER intends to exercise enforcement discretion during the COVID19 PHE with respect to the dispensing of mifepristone through the mail either by or under the supervision of a certified prescriber, or through a mail-order pharmacy when such dispensing is done under the supervision of a certified prescriber,” Woodcock wrote. 

Since 2000, the FDA had placed the abortion pill regimen on its REMS list, or “Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy.” The list is reserved for higher-risk drugs and procedures, and under the regimen, the abortion pill could only be prescribed in-person by a certified prescriber in a health clinic setting.

Pro-abortion groups sued the Trump administration over the regulation in 2020, however, claiming that the extraordinary circumstances of the pandemic warranted that women be able to obtain the abortion pill remotely.

In July, Judge Theodore Chuang of the Maryland district placed an injunction on the FDA regulations during the pandemic. The Supreme Court ultimately ruled in the Trump administration’s favor by reversing Chuang’s injunction in a 6-3 decision. 

The FDA’s April 12 letter means that women will be able to receive the abortion pill through the mail during the pandemic.  

Mancini said that the FDA’s data from 2018 showed “thousands of adverse events” as a result of the abortion pill, “including 768 hospitalizations and 24 deaths since 2000.”

“Chemical abortions should have more medical oversight not less,” said Mancini.  

Xavier Becerra, the new Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS), pushed for the FDA to roll back its regulations of the abortion pill during the pandemic. At his confirmation hearing in February, Becerra said that the regimen should be available remotely.

Marjorie Dannenfelser, president of the Susan B. Anthony List, said the FDA’s decision was “pure politics” and accused pro-abortion activists of “exploiting the COVID-19 pandemic from the beginning, working to eliminate safety precautions in order to expand the proliferation of dangerous chemical abortion drugs.”

Dannenfelser added that the decision to allow telemedicine abortions “prioritizes abortion industry profits over the health and safety of women” and is evidence of the “abortion extremism of the Biden-Harris administration.” 

“This is flagrant and dangerous disregard for the health and safety of American women and girls,” she said. 

Students for Life of America President Kristan Hawkins noted that Woodcock herself had testified in 2006 that “women have died and been injured ingesting these chemicals.” 

“The parsed language of her letter downplays all the reasons for greater medical engagement,” Hawkins stated.

“We know that the chemicals have four times the complications of surgical abortion, can cause dangerous complications later in pregnancy and in ectopic pregnancies, and can harm women’s future fertility if handed out without proper screening and treatment for blood type,” said Hawkins. 

Hawkins noted that the availability of the drugs through the mail poses a risk to women, “if abusers get hold of the drugs to force on women, sometimes without their knowledge or consent.”

Pro-life leaders: Allowing mail-order abortion pill will pose 'grave danger' for women

Ivanko80/Shutterstock

Washington D.C., Apr 13, 2021 / 18:00 pm (CNA).

Pro-life groups criticized the Biden administration for allowing the distribution of the abortion pill through the mail during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

“With this action, the Biden administration has made it clear that it will prioritize abortion over women's safety,” said March for Life President Jeanne Mancini. “Allowing unsupervised chemical abortions via telemedicine, without requiring timely access to medical care, will put women in grave danger.”

In a Monday letter from the commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the FDA announced it would “exercise enforcement discretion” on its regulations of the abortion pill. Acting FDA commissioner Janet Woodcock said she would allow for the abortion pill regimen to be prescribed remotely and sent to women through the mail or through a mail-order pharmacy.

“Further, to the extent all of the other requirements of the Mifepristone REMS Program are met, CDER intends to exercise enforcement discretion during the COVID19 PHE with respect to the dispensing of mifepristone through the mail either by or under the supervision of a certified prescriber, or through a mail-order pharmacy when such dispensing is done under the supervision of a certified prescriber,” Woodcock wrote. 

Since 2000, the FDA had placed the abortion pill regimen on its REMS list, or “Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy.” The list is reserved for higher-risk drugs and procedures, and under the regimen, the abortion pill could only be prescribed in-person by a certified prescriber in a health clinic setting.

Pro-abortion groups sued the Trump administration over the regulation in 2020, however, claiming that the extraordinary circumstances of the pandemic warranted that women be able to obtain the abortion pill remotely.

In July, Judge Theodore Chuang of the Maryland district placed an injunction on the FDA regulations during the pandemic. The Supreme Court ultimately ruled in the Trump administration’s favor by reversing Chuang’s injunction in a 6-3 decision. 

The FDA’s April 12 letter means that women will be able to receive the abortion pill through the mail during the pandemic.  

Mancini said that the FDA’s data from 2018 showed “thousands of adverse events” as a result of the abortion pill, “including 768 hospitalizations and 24 deaths since 2000.”

“Chemical abortions should have more medical oversight not less,” said Mancini.  

Xavier Becerra, the new Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS), pushed for the FDA to roll back its regulations of the abortion pill during the pandemic. At his confirmation hearing in February, Becerra said that the regimen should be available remotely.

Marjorie Dannenfelser, president of the Susan B. Anthony List, said the FDA’s decision was “pure politics” and accused pro-abortion activists of “exploiting the COVID-19 pandemic from the beginning, working to eliminate safety precautions in order to expand the proliferation of dangerous chemical abortion drugs.”

Dannenfelser added that the decision to allow telemedicine abortions “prioritizes abortion industry profits over the health and safety of women” and is evidence of the “abortion extremism of the Biden-Harris administration.” 

“This is flagrant and dangerous disregard for the health and safety of American women and girls,” she said. 

Students for Life of America President Kristan Hawkins noted that Woodcock herself had testified in 2006 that “women have died and been injured ingesting these chemicals.” 

“The parsed language of her letter downplays all the reasons for greater medical engagement,” Hawkins stated.

“We know that the chemicals have four times the complications of surgical abortion, can cause dangerous complications later in pregnancy and in ectopic pregnancies, and can harm women’s future fertility if handed out without proper screening and treatment for blood type,” said Hawkins. 

Hawkins noted that the availability of the drugs through the mail poses a risk to women, “if abusers get hold of the drugs to force on women, sometimes without their knowledge or consent.”